Last Week’s Films (03/09 – 16/09)

The Endless (Justin Benson & Aaron Muirhead, 2017)

I saw this one in the cinema and it was introduced by a gentleman that works there who saw it at a festival as a film that “blew his mind”, and I have to say that after the film ended I was a bit let-down. There was some nice time-related loopy-ness, and the setting of the campground/living space of a “cult” was fairly interesting, but the characters were a bit unengaging, the story was a bit boring and convoluted, and the effects, while not bad, seemed distractingly iffy (which is not surprising given the low budget). Not something I’ll watch again, but it was okay. 5/10

The Guest (Adam Wingard, 2014)

A man shows up at a family’s home claiming to be the ex-army buddy of their now-deceased son. Through his interactions with the family we can see he’s not all he seems. There’s some fun action sequences in here, and the plot is suitably B-Movie nonsensical. Overall well-made and well-executed enjoyable nonsense. 6/10

Man With a Movie Camera (Dziga Vertov, 1929)

Watched this one for class. While I found it interesting from an academic standpoint to see the development of montage as a cinematic technique displayed in this film, the film itself left me a bit cold. It’s good to see the display of these editing techniques and think about why it is that they work, and notable in being one of the first to showcase them, it’s not really something I would choose to sit down and watch for enjoyment. Pioneering and interesting, yes. Enjoyable as a “movie”? Not so much. 5.5/10

The Predator (Shane Black, 2018)

What a bloody mess. I’m not talking about the gore either, which just made me yearn for the days of squibs, but the plot, the tone, the characters. All a mess. I lost count of the amount of times I thought “Well that was stupid.”, and the only good part of the film was when it ended. I wasn’t exactly expecting this to be any good, but with Shane Black attached as director thought it might have a chance of being something acceptable. Instead it was just annoying. The characters were either irritating, bland, quippy, or some combination of all three. It would be the worst film I saw released in 2018 if I hadn’t seen Day of the Dead: Bloodline. 2.5/10

American Animals (Bart Layton, 2018)

A group of college students attempt to stage a heist to steal some valuable art that is kept in their campus library. What was most interesting about this film was that it was half documentary, half dramatization, since the story is based on true events, we see the people who were involved in the real-life heist on screen and talking us through what went down, before cutting back to the dramatised action. So we get to see conflicting recollections from the main perpetrators unfold on-screen, as well as see the unromantic reality of how these events impacted their lives after the fact. I liked these touches, and it helped to ground the film in reality. 6/10

Jacob’s Ladder (Adrian Lyne, 1990)

Tim Robbins plays Vietnam vet Jacob, struggling with the loss of his child and dealing with the after effects of his stint in Vietnam. He appears disassociated from life and at times even reality itself. The film was intriguing, and seems to ask of its audience philosophical and spiritual questions about death . There were some disturbing sequences and overall a feeling of malaise and sadness throughout the film, making it an effective and subtle horror film, but perhaps one you would need to be in the correct mind-set for before watching. 5.5/10

Mandy (Panos Cosmatos, 2018)

Well, it looks spectacular, but it’s all in service of a fairly derivative and dull horror plot about a maniacal cult leader abducting someone’s girlfriend and ultimately murdering her. I suppose it helps drive Nicolas Cage’s character crazy, which is always fun to watch, but for me the film takes far too long to get into the action, and seems to be spend too much time navel-gazing. As I say, it looks spectacular, but it was the only thing the film had going for it, for me. 4/10

Hearts Beat Loud (Brett Haley, 2018)

This was a cute little story about a man who owns a record shop and his daughter who record a song together, it ends up getting play on Spotify and the man (played by Nick Offerman) dreams of the pair going on tour and properly starting a band whereas his daughter just wants to go to medical school. I really enjoyed the chemistry between the father and daughter, and the use of music throughout was very good too. 6/10