Last Week’s Films (23/07 – 29/07)

Get Shorty (Barry Sonnenfeld, 1995)

This gangster film is a sort of Pulp Fiction-lite, with John Travolta in the starring role as Chili Palmer, a loan shark who has ended up in Los Angeles and tries his hand at becoming a film producer. There’s a colourful supporting cast including Gene Hackman and Danny DeVito, and overall it’s pretty light for a gangster film, and amusing too. It’s no Pulp Fiction, but it’s still pretty good. 6/10

WarGames (John Badham, 1983)

When many controllers at US missile silos fail to follow procedure and seem unable to launch their missiles during a surprise drill, NORAD decides to replace the human controllers with a computer system. Later, hacker Matthew Broderick, looking to hack a games company’s server to play an as yet unreleased game, finds an unidentified server with a list of games including “Global Thermonuclear War”, and begins to play. The systems at NORAD all show this simulation taking place, and it’s taken by both the US and Soviet governments as the opposite side preparing to launch a nuclear strike. So Broderick must end the simulation with the computer system before the real world is destroyed through nuclear warfare, but the system will not end its simulation until the game is complete. It’s an interesting Cold War era thriller with a satisfying ending. It also seems like it would have been plausible at the time, given how on edge the US and USSR were during the Cold War. I imagine at the time it would have been fairly chilling, considering the climate of the Cold War. 6/10

The Birdcage (Mike Nichols, 1996)

Armand (Robin Williams) and Albert (Nathan Lane) are as a gay couple in Los Angeles. Armand owns “The Birdcage”, a drag nightclub, and Albert is its star attraction. Armand’s son Val comes home and reveals he has gotten engaged, and asks his father if he can pretend to be straight for the visit of his fiancé’s parents, conservative Senator Kevin Keeley (Gene Hackman) and his wife. Armand is hurt by this, but agrees to try, with Albert posing as Val’s uncle. Much of the comedy comes from the pair’s attempts to butch themselves up, particularly for the especially flamboyant Albert. I laughed quite frequently through this film, the flamboyant performance of Nathan Lane working well with the comparatively subdued one of Robin Williams, and Gene Hackman pitching his gruff, slightly clueless conservative Senator perfectly. Rather than being a film which laughs at homosexual culture, it gave its characters depth and had you empathise with them throughout, with the laughs coming from the absurdity of the situation rather than the fact these men are gay, or that there happen to be many men in drag. Overall, pretty warm and entertaining. 6/10

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